10 posts tagged burma

See these images?

pbnpineapples:

themindislimitless:

Both of these images are false.

The first one is an edited image from an article from 2004: 80 Thai Muslims suffocate after arrest at protest. It has nothing to do with Burmese soldiers but Thai soldiers, and it was not a deliberate massacre. Those people died because they were weak from lack of food combined with the suffocation caused of being held together in a tiny area.

The second image is of Buddhist monks cremating China’s earthquake victims from 2010. And Buddhist monks are very unlikely to kill people- any people- at all, because of their beliefs- spreading lies about them like this is a complete disrespect of what they believe in.

Not only are those images and others like them a disrespect of what the Burmese people suffer from, they are nothing but misinformation and lies that complicate matters further and thus only hurt people. It is true that the Burmese government enforces the persecution of Muslims in Burma, but not like this. Spreading lies does not help the cause. Misinformation is not helping.

If you’re so concerned about what’s happening in Burma, then actually educate yourself about the issue instead of spreading lies.

i m just gonna keep reblogging this until ppl understand not  to circulate around fake pictures. it would mean a lot if my followers did the same but no one is obligated to. 

15 July 2012 ♥ 106 notes    Reblog    
reblogged from pbnpineapples    source: themindislimitless
From the perspective of a “Kalaar”

themindislimitless:

rahgheer:

It was day before yesterday that I had a semi-panicked e-mail from a close friend in Myanmar:

There’s a lot of stuff happening in Myanmar right now. About Muslims and riots…
Read some news online. And please pray for peace for everyone. I don’t want to be burned to death or hit by 100 people or raped…

I don’t think anyone anticipates such an email from a friend overseas first thing over breakfast on a Monday morning. Especially a newly married friend.

I understand the tensions that there are there within the Burmese people and the Rohingya. For those of you who don’t know, the Rohingiya are seen as illegal Muslim migrants from Bangladesh, even though many have been living in Myanmar for centuries. But the prosecution faced by the Muslims within Myanmar is not just for the Rohingiya, there is a deep seated resentment within the Burmese for all Muslims, despite their ethnicity and their roots. At the very forefront, the Rohingiya are considered an international problem by many Burmese, and fiercely cast as the “other”.

How did this rioting start? Because there was a rape of a Buddhist Rakhine woman, which in turn prompted revenge killings of 10 Muslim men, which in turn spurned a Muslim mob to kill seven Buddhist men. Never mind the torched houses. Never mind that men accused of the rape are reported to have been arrested. 

The news that is coming from within Burma unnerves me. Because this is not the first time that rioting has erupted against minorities in Myanmar, especially Muslims (though I do believe this is the first time it is being reported considerably openly from within Myanmar). The last time that this happened, I was in fourth or fifth grade. The last time that this happened, the stories that circulated along the grapevine (media censorship was very high at that time, so nothing could be reported openly), very horrifying. This is not the first time I am hearing of homes torched on such a large scale. This is not the first time I am hearing of Muslims killed senselessly. This is not the first time that I am hearing such deep resentment against the “Kalaar”. Those of South Asian descent. Usually Muslims. 

And I am glad to hear that Burmese officials are confident that the violence will not spread, and will be contained. Because I am not. I am not confident that angry mobs will not show up to homes of friends and family back home. They almost did last time at mine. So it scares me. My memories are not pleasant. And I am not saying that the officials cannot, and/or will not contain the violence. I am just afraid. 

And I am not just afraid. I am hurt too. Because in my memory, when the riots erupted against the Muslims last time in Myanmar, it was our Buddhist neighbors who came to us few Muslims living on that street and told us to not be worried; [our Buddhist neighbors] will take care of any “situation” that may come up.  It hurts when so many Burmese openly call us “terrorists”. And treat as the “other”. 

Because I may be “Kalaar”, and my Burmese may be very blotchy because of a lot of reasons, but I am as much of a Burmese National as they are. I was born in that country. I laughed there, I grew up there, I made ever lasting friends there. I take pride in our democratic movement, and Daw Aung San Su Kyi. And I didn’t “immigrate.” My family’s history, as much as they are “Kalaar”, can at least be safely traced back to before Independence from the Burmese colonists, if not even longer. And yes, so can the Rohingiya. 

We are your own. This is our country as much as yours. You can’t throw us out this easily. 

I love you. This is perfect. This post is perfect. For my followers, more context:

I’ve been talking to people in Burma, and there’s way too much stuff that’s happening that’s not being reported. A lot of specifics. The deaths are reported as numbering 21 right now, but there’s more deaths than that. This was a massacre. Riots that started and lasted for days.

The idea that the army or government is about to do anything for the Rakhine is laughable. The peace is not kept because of a buildup of a good relationship, it is enforced by fear. The government will only stop Muslims who’re out in protest. They will not stop the Buddhists. We have no protection from the government.

We have been subjected to killings and oppression for years. Since the time we came. I will call it what it is: it is a genocide of the many Muslims in Burma. The idea that we’re taking over Burma in any way is laughable, completely so. We’re right at the bottom, starving, live in low income areas, have poor housing and schooling. It is enforced by the government. Does anyone seriously expect them to protect us?

There have been curfews set in all Muslim-majority people in Burma. The Rakhine in the north, the Ayyarwady region in the south. Muslims are not allowed to segregate for prayer in a jamaat. The azaan, call to prayer, has been forbidden- that had been for a while, and was renewed.

Martial law has been established in the Rakhine.

There are people who say that the story of the rape of a Burmese Buddhist woman is not true. The last major riots? Had been a story that had been used to ignite mass attacks against the Muslims and had been proven false. But by then it was too late. And then it was covered up. Considering that, the likelihood that this is another fabricated story is…likely. I’m not saying that it doesn’t happen. But this particular one, to start the riots, may not be true at all. There’s some who say the woman is Muslim.

There is no evidence that a Buddhist woman was raped or killed, by the way. So. The Muslims in the bus who were killed do not even have any relations to the three Muslim men ‘suspected’.

Some in the news media industry told the story and refereed to the Burmese Muslims as Kalaar Muslims. Stop. That is a racial slur. Is is, at times, used by Burmese Muslims as an identification, as the reclaiming of a word, but no one who is not a Burmese Muslim may use it. It is racist. There was a protest against this. The news issued a small apology, but it does not really address the real issue.

We are not illegals. We are not terrorists. We are one and the same, Burmese. When there is no equality for some people, there is no equality for anyone at all.

18 June 2012 ♥ 15 notes    Reblog    
reblogged from themindislimitless    source: rahgheer
❝ Within a system which denies the existence of basic human rights, fear tends to be the order of the day. Fear of imprisonment, fear of torture, fear of death, fear of losing friends, family, property or means of livelihood, fear of poverty, fear of isolation, fear of failure. A most insidious form of fear is that which masquerades as common sense or even wisdom, condemning as foolish, reckless, insignificant or futile the small, daily acts of courage which help to preserve man’s self-respect and inherent human dignity. It is not easy for a people conditioned by fear under the iron rule of the principle that might is right to free themselves from the enervating miasma of fear. Yet even under the most crushing state machinery courage rises up again and again, for fear is not the natural state of civilized man. ❞

— Aung San Suu Kyi (via homininae)

15 June 2012 ♥ 16 notes    Reblog    
reblogged from
From the perspective of a “Kalaar”

rahgheer:

It was day before yesterday that I had a semi-panicked e-mail from a close friend in Myanmar:

There’s a lot of stuff happening in Myanmar right now. About Muslims and riots…
Read some news online. And please pray for peace for everyone. I don’t want to be burned to death or hit by 100 people or raped…
I don’t think anyone anticipates such an email from a friend overseas first thing over breakfast on a Monday morning. Especially a newly married friend.
I understand the tensions that there are there within the Burmese people and the Rohingya. For those of you who don’t know, the Rohingiya are seen as illegal Muslim migrants from Bangladesh, even though many have been living in Myanmar for centuries. But the prosecution faced by the Muslims within Myanmar is not just for the Rohingiya, there is a deep seated resentment within the Burmese for all Muslims, despite their ethnicity and their roots. At the very forefront, the Rohingiya are considered an international problem by many Burmese, and fiercely cast as the “other”.
How did this rioting start? Because there was a rape of a Buddhist Rakhine woman, which in turn prompted revenge killings of 10 Muslim men, which in turn spurned a Muslim mob to kill seven Buddhist men. Never mind the torched houses. Never mind that men accused of the rape are reported to have been arrested. 
The news that is coming from within Burma unnerves me. Because this is not the first time that rioting has erupted against minorities in Myanmar, especially Muslims (though I do believe this is the first time it is being reported considerably openly from within Myanmar). The last time that this happened, I was in fourth or fifth grade. The last time that this happened, the stories that circulated along the grapevine (media censorship was very high at that time, so nothing could be reported openly), very horrifying. This is not the first time I am hearing of homes torched on such a large scale. This is not the first time I am hearing of Muslims killed senselessly. This is not the first time that I am hearing such deep resentment against the “Kalaar”. Those of South Asian descent. Usually Muslims. 
And I am glad to hear that Burmese officials are confident that the violence will not spread, and will be contained. Because I am not. I am not confident that angry mobs will not show up to homes of friends and family back home. They almost did last time at mine. So it scares me. My memories are not pleasant. And I am not saying that the officials cannot, and/or will not contain the violence. I am just afraid. 
And I am not just afraid. I am hurt too. Because in my memory, when the riots erupted against the Muslims last time in Myanmar, it was our Buddhist neighbors who came to us few Muslims living on that street and told us to not be worried; [our Buddhist neighbors] will take care of any “situation” that may come up.  It hurts when so many Burmese openly call us “terrorists”. And treat as the “other”. 
Because I may be “Kalaar”, and my Burmese may be very blotchy because of a lot of reasons, but I am as much of a Burmese National as they are. I was born in that country. I laughed there, I grew up there, I made ever lasting friends there. I take pride in our democratic movement, and Daw Aung San Su Kyi. And I didn’t “immigrate.” My family’s history, as much as they are “Kalaar”, can at least be safely traced back to before Independence from the Burmese colonists, if not even longer. And yes, so can the Rohingiya. 
We are your own. This is our country as much as yours. You can’t throw us out this easily. 
15 June 2012 ♥ 15 notes    Reblog    
reblogged from rahgheer
❝ Within a system which denies the existence of basic human rights, fear tends to be the order of the day. Fear of imprisonment, fear of torture, fear of death, fear of losing friends, family, property or means of livelihood, fear of poverty, fear of isolation, fear of failure. A most insidious form of fear is that which masquerades as common sense or even wisdom, condemning as foolish, reckless, insignificant or futile the small, daily acts of courage which help to preserve man’s self-respect and inherent human dignity. It is not easy for a people conditioned by fear under the iron rule of the principle that might is right to free themselves from the enervating miasma of fear. Yet even under the most crushing state machinery courage rises up again and again, for fear is not the natural state of civilized man. ❞

— Aung San Suu Kyi (via homininae)

15 June 2012 ♥ 16 notes    Reblog    
reblogged from
whatismyanmar:

Mrauk Oo, the ancient capital of Rakhine State in Myanmar. It is an alternative to Bagan to visit if you love to see ancient pagodas and buildings.

whatismyanmar:

Mrauk Oo, the ancient capital of Rakhine State in Myanmar. It is an alternative to Bagan to visit if you love to see ancient pagodas and buildings.

31 May 2012 ♥ 26 notes    Reblog    
reblogged from whatismyanmar
Burma struggling to handle visitors ›

themindislimitless:

Now that Burma is opening to the outside world, good luck getting a hotel room.

Travellers and eager investors are pouring in to explore one of Asia’s most untouched countries, filling hotels to capacity, doubling room rates and spilling flight reservations onto wait lists.

As the country sheds its past as an isolated military dictatorship and taboo travel destination it’s becoming a new global hotspot - topping tourism lists as the must-see place to visit in 2012.

Burma is eager for the hard currency that foreigners bring, but is struggling to handle the influx. At the same time, it’s wondering how widely to throw open the doors - should it become another well-trodden tourist haven like Thailand or should it aim for fewer, less-transformative numbers of visitors like Bhutan to keep its ancient cultural sights and charm intact?

For now, Burma is the sort of time-warped place that adventurous travellers love. It’s an Asian Buddhist wonderland with red-robed monks and bicycle rickshaws where British colonial relics line the streets. There are no Starbucks or McDonald’s or name-brand Western hotels, but some of that will soon change.

New laws are being drafted to make it easier and tax-friendly for foreign hotel chains and others to do business in Burma. Auctions are under way for dozens of colonial buildings that some developers want to restore as boutique hotels and others want to tear down. Tourism authorities say the country needs more restaurants that cater to international tastes, more car rental agencies, more airplanes to shuttle tourists to the sacred temples in Bagan, more English-speaking tour guides, more everything.

Read more here.

So Myanmar’s tourism industry is booming. I ought to be delighted, everyone wants to visit my country, right? Oh yeah, Burmese pride!
Well, not quite.
I’m not quite sure what I make of it, but I’m definitely side-eyeing it. It feels too much like appropriation on a large scale done willfully. The tourists will come. The government/ military junta will patch up places of the cities for them to wander around in, it will look beautiful and charming. Well, Myanmar is beautiful. But that’s not the point. The point is that everyone goes over and looks at the Padaw pan and eats the mangoes and looks around in the pagodas but no one really cares about the country. No one goes there and thinks about how there’s a bloody revolution taking place. No tourist in the fancy parts of the city is going to see the children on the street who’re kidnapped and forced into labour. All they will see are the rubies, and the teak wood, and they will forget the genocide in the country.

That’s what kills me. They will come in, they will take our culture and mold it to their liking, and they will leave with our lives. Ignore the suffering. Everyone does. I’m not sure why I expect anything anymore, really.

vach:

absolutely beautiful

10 July 2011 ♥ 27 notes    Reblog    
reblogged from vach
whatismyanmar:

Hkakabo Razi is the highest mountain in Southeast Asia and situated in most northern part of Myanmar. Isn’t it amazing to see an ice mountain in Myanmar where you can also find burning area like Bagan?

whatismyanmar:

Hkakabo Razi is the highest mountain in Southeast Asia and situated in most northern part of Myanmar. Isn’t it amazing to see an ice mountain in Myanmar where you can also find burning area like Bagan?

10 July 2011 ♥ 24 notes    Reblog    
reblogged from whatismyanmar